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CENACOLO OF LEONARDO DA VINCI

THE LAST SUPPER DI LEONARDO DA VINCI

THE LAST SUPPER DI LEONARDO DA VINCI - VOLENDO VIAGGI
1.  WALKING TOUR OF MILAN MAIN SIGHTS AND LEONARDO'S SUPPER

3 HOURS WITH AN ENGLISH GUIDE
NO LINE TO VISIT LEONARDO DA VINCI "THE LAST SUPPER "!!!
15 MINUTES TO ENJOY THE PAINTING ALL BY YOURSELF
VISIT DUOMO OF MILAN INSIDE
VISIT CASTELLO SFORZESCO
STROLL IN VRERA DISTRICT
SEE THEATRE LA SCALA

The final stop and highlight of this walking tour is Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, hidden away at the Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie. This enormous and complex 15th-century mural captures the emotional moment in which Jesus announces that one of his 12 disciples will betray him. The painting had been severely damaged over the centuries, and has only very recently undergone a painstaking 21-year restoration, revealing the original colors and details of this masterpiece.

The delicate nature of this mural and its importance means entrance is strictly limited to those who have pre-booked – only one group is allowed to stand with the painting at a time, in a specially conditioned room, for 15 minutes only. This Skip-the-Line Tour of Milan includes pre-booked entrance, guaranteeing exclusive no line entry and an intimate viewing of this special painting.

EURO 55,00 PER ADULT
EURO 50,00 FOR CHILDREN UNDER 12 YEARS OLD
ENTRANCE TICKETS TO VISIT THE LAST SUPPER IS INCLUDED
HEADSETS TO LISTEN CLEARLY TO THE GUIDE INCLUDED TOO

GROUP IS NOT MORE THAN 25 PERSONS
THE TOUR STARTS IN CENTER OF MILAN AT 10 30 AM OR AT 14 30 PM

2.  LAST SUPPER TOUR
Discover Leonardo’s masterpiece and the marvelous church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, an architectural gem by Bramante.
Duration and cost: 1h and 30 min; €25 per person.
Booking fee euro 5,00 per person

3  SPECIAL TOUR: Last Supper, Santa Maria delle Grazie and the Codex Atlanticus Exhibition
Make the most of your time at the Santa Maria delle Grazie complex by visiting also the fascinating exhibition of some drawings by Leonardo.
Duration and cost: 2h; €30 per person.
Booking fee euro 5,00 per person

4  Pinacoteca Ambrosiana tour 
Discover Leonardo’s ‘Portrait of a Musician’, his drawings from the Codex Atlanticus and all the other great artworks by Caravaggio, Raphael and Titian, housed in this historic art gallery.
Duration and cost: 2h; €30 per person.
Booking fee euro 5,00 per person

Please send your requests at booking@volendoviaggi.it

MORE INFORMATION

You may wonder why Leonardo, aged around 30, decided to move to Milan at all. At the time (1480s) he was living in Florence, the city of the Medici Family renowned for their art patronage which in turn attracted the most talented artists of the time such as Michelangelo and Botticelli. Florence was however an essentially humanist city celebrating the rediscovery of the antiques and classical culture.
Milan was instead characterised by a more pragmatic approach representing therefore a cultural environment more conducive to Leonardo’s aspirations and more supportive of his experiments. The Duchy of Milan, ruled at the time by Ludovico il Moro, was wealthy, modern and industrious but not so firmly established and with a consolidated power. The ruling house of Sforza had only come to power in 1450 and Milan was still at war with Venice and coveted by other European States. Hence, Ludovico il Moro was much interested in all of Leonardo’s war machines and other inventions which could strengthen the city as well as in his artistic skills since the Italian city-states were in constant struggle to establish their cultural supremacy.

The Last Supper
The Last Supper after restoration
Centuries before the invention of camera and cinema Leonardo da Vinci captured in a wall-painting a unique moment of drama and excitement. Christ has just announced the betrayal by one of the apostles, an announcement which throws into panic those present, a turning point which is going to lead to extreme consequences for Christ…
The setting
The painting covers one wall of an oblong hall which used to be the refectory of the monks in the monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie. One must imagine what it was like for the monks to have their tables side by side with the table of Christ and his apostles.
The Composition
Leonardo’s picture is very different from the traditional representation of this biblical story, where the apostles were always depicted as sitting quietly at the table in a row. Christ has just spoken the tragic words and the apostles shrink back in terror as they hear the revelation. In a dramatic contrast Christ sits calm and resigned amidst the turmoil. However, there is nothing chaotic in the picture. The twelve apostles fall quite naturally in groups of three on his left and right, linked to each other by gestures and movements. It is a harmonious interplay of movements, an astonishing achievement in a painting which is by its nature static. The scene is lit by a cold clear light that brings forth in analytic detail every object. The plates, the food, the transparency of the glasses and the folds and decorations in the tablecloth form an extraordinary still life frieze.
From science to artistic depiction
Looking at the apostles’ gestures, it is interesting to note that the closer the figures are to the centre of the scene the more marked their reactions are. This is the result of Leonardo's understanding of the laws of acoustics he was studying at this time. To use his words: “those who are closer better understand, the furthest do not hear at all.”